DA50 vs The World

Any DA50 related topics.

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TimS
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Re: DA50 vs The World

Post by TimS »

Cirrus gear is not "bouncy", it is on the stiff side.
Diamond and Cessna gear are more forgiving of poor airmanship.

Having watched way too many Cessna pilots land with all three wheels or occasionally the front wheel first; you can see how with low wing planes with much greater ground effect can run into problems. You land a low wing plane with all three wheels in a flat view, the plane is often still "flyable" in ground effect, suddenly you will bounce the plane, often the nose will rise faster and change the AOA to climb. Leave ground effect, and watch the plane start to come down, and the pilot tries to correct pushing the nose down, and wham, the prop strikes.

This is not a "Cirrus" specific issue. When you dig into the history, you will see it on a number of planes, Cirrus, Bonanza, and Columbia/TTx for example. Although not required, a good pilot (my opinion) would get some transition training in any new to them aircraft type.

Tim
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dmloftus
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Re: DA50 vs The World

Post by dmloftus »

Very sad. Unfortunate those guys talking in the video didn't render immediate help rather than standing there yelling "WTF"
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mfdutra
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Re: DA50 vs The World

Post by mfdutra »

I think it's pretty common for people to freeze when they witness something like that. The sudden realization that someone just died right in front of you isn't easy to process.
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photoSteveZ
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Re: DA50 vs The World

Post by photoSteveZ »

TimS wrote: Wed Mar 27, 2024 9:03 pm Cirrus gear is not "bouncy", it is on the stiff side.
Diamond and Cessna gear are more forgiving of poor airmanship.

Having watched way too many Cessna pilots land with all three wheels or occasionally the front wheel first; you can see how with low wing planes with much greater ground effect can run into problems. You land a low wing plane with all three wheels in a flat view, the plane is often still "flyable" in ground effect, suddenly you will bounce the plane, often the nose will rise faster and change the AOA to climb. Leave ground effect, and watch the plane start to come down, and the pilot tries to correct pushing the nose down, and wham, the prop strikes.

This is not a "Cirrus" specific issue. When you dig into the history, you will see it on a number of planes, Cirrus, Bonanza, and Columbia/TTx for example. Although not required, a good pilot (my opinion) would get some transition training in any new to them aircraft type.

Tim
A ‘bounced’ landing in tricycle gear aircraft is often nosewheel first, which by definition means the airspeed is high enough that the sudden pitch up sends the aircraft flying again. Unless the pilot is trained to recognize what’s happening and initiate a go around immediately, such a ‘wheelbarrow landing’ will result in a pilot induced oscillation, with the pilot out of phase and overcorrecting. Each subsequent bounce is more violent, with the nose lower at touchdown and the pitch up more pronounced. After two or three of these oscillations, the pilot may try to initiate a go around with the nose very high, which is what I suspect happened in the Duxford fatality.

If you’ve ever witnessed a ‘wheelbarrow’ landing and subsequent PIO, as I have, you never forget it.
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